Pyromasse Home Page


The Oven of Philip Baker





The Bakery at Stanbridge East on the Pike River in Quebec has long been known for its wood fired oven.




The oven seen here is a recent rebuild of the original oven designed and built by the baker himself, Philip Baker. The rebuild took place with the assistance of a Belgian specialist.




The indirect wood fired oven has a fire box directly below the hearth. The hearth is formed of one slab of refractory concrete, which is contacted directly by the flame. From below the hearth the gases are drawn through a series of openings in the top of the side walls of the fire box, into two narrow, though wide, channels which follow the curve of each side of the vault. These two side channels are the length of the vault and rise from just below the springing line to the top centre where they enter a lateral flueway running, front to back, along the top of the vault into the chimney which is built against the rear of the oven.

The bolt-on arched iron plates each side of the loading doors, give full access to the two side channels. The two square access doors below them allow acess to the manifolds at the top of the fire box side walls. Below the loading doors is the fire box door and bellow that, the ash box door.




View inside the fire box showing the under side of the refractory slab that forms the hearth. A refractory brick piller supports the slab in its centre. The openings in to the manifold and the side channels can be seen at the top of the fire box walls.
Note: In this case manifold is used to describe the place of thansition, within the smoke path, between the fire box walls and the start of the side channels.




The bake chamber. The mesh grill, on which the bake load is placed, is supported about 3 inches above the surface of the hearth , which becomes too hot to cook directly upon, due to it being the closest element of the bake chamber to the heat source.



Marcus Flynn

2009



Navigation       Articles by Marcus Flynn
Contact Pyromasse